Community Outreach

 

Jacket Philanthropy Program

 
The Jacket Philanthropy Program is a student-led philanthropy program implemented through academic service-learning.  Students in participating courses provide direct service to non-profit organizations.  In addition to their service hours, students have the opportunity to award grant funds to selected organizations.


Students engage in hands-on philanthropy, grant-making and community service.  The program focuses on three needs areas:  children and youth programs; neighborhood development and revitalization; and hunger, homelessness, and health issues. Students are responsible for developing an RFP (Request for Funding Proposal), preparing the grant proposal, and engaging in a group decision-making process to award the funds.  Each class receives funding to distribute.

Spring 2010 - 37 students in two courses (Psychology - Child Maltreatment taught by Dr. Lisa Green and Sociology - Urban and Community Life taught by Dr. Carol Gregory) provided over 500 hours of service to seven nonprofit organizations and awarded $9,000.

Spring Semester 2011, 53 students in three courses - (Child Maltreatment, Urban and Community Life, and a new course English - Grant Writing co-taught by Dr. Susan Oldrieve and Annie Heidersbach) provided over 1,000 hours of service hours and awarded $13,500.

Spring Semester 2012, 58 students in three courses provided over 850 hours of service to 14 organizations and awarded $6,000.

Spring Semester 2013 - as the program continues to grow, a new course was added this year - Health & Social Justice in the Public Health Program taught by Dr. Swagata Banik. Fifty-three students provided over 800 hours of service to 16 organizations and awarded $11,000.

Spring Semester 2014 - the program continues to grow as a fifth course was added this year,  Philanthropy and Nonprofits in the Business Division taught by Jacob Kamm.  Sixty-five students will provide over 800 hours of service to 16 organizations and award $22,000.

Since the program's inception, 266 students provided close to 4,000 hours of service and awarded $61,500 in grant funds.


PROGRAM GOALS

  • Award charitable dollars to worthy non-profit organizations with strong proposals that address immediate economic needs.
  • Build stronger communities through a skill-based volunteer force that contributes both hours served (15 per student) and financial resources.
  • Provide students with the intellectual knowledge and practical experiences needed to manage philanthropic funding, including skills such as conducting needs assessments, establishing funding criteria, researching local nonprofits, interviewing community members, and developing writing, decision-making, accounting, and evaluation skills.
  • Engage students and faculty with local communities in order to promote understanding and connectedness.
  • Serve as a model for passing along the practice and knowledge of philanthropy and volunteerism.

    Participating non-profit organizations have included: AIDS Task Force, Applewood Centers, Art House, Bellfaire JCB, Bellflower, Berea CDC, Building Hope in the City, Care Alliance, Cleveland Rape Crisis Center, the City Mission, Cogswell Hall, Dress for Success, Esperanza, The Free Medical Clinic of Greater Cleveland, Girls with Sole, the LGBT Center, Malachi House, NEOCH, Neighborhood Family Practice, Providence House, Rainey Institute, St. Malachi Center, Scranton Road Ministries, Slavic Village, Towards Employment, Transitional Housing, University Settlement, and the West Side Catholic Center.

    Financial support to sustain the program has been provided by the David Brain Leadership Program, the Zilber Family Foundation, Christy Walkuski (BW Alumna), the Center for Health Disparities and Baldwin Wallace University.


For additional information, contact Mila P. Cooper, Director of Community Outreach & Campus Program Coordinator at mcooper@bw.edu or (440) 826-2301.
 

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