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Fall 2003 Course Schedule- Honors

Day Division- Semester

* HON-100-S01 Enduring Ideas: Global Ethics  4  6:00PM-9:00PM  T  CLLC  2nd Floor  K. Coble
Core Academic Skill: Writing
Core Academic Skill: Ethical Impact
This course is open only to students formally accepted into the Honors Program starting Fall, 2003. In the format of readings, films, discussion, and debate, students will explore the complex set of moral issues broadly falling under the rubric of globalization. We can best approach these issues by sorting them into two groups: the challenge of sustainable development and the problem of cross-cultural moral disagreement. The first group of moral issues includes the pros and cons of the global market economy, our responsibility to the environment, and the conflict between the need to curb population growth and the infringement of basic rights that often occurs when governments try to regular reproduction. The second group of moral problems includes the alleged fact of the clash of civilizations and the conflict between the intuitively universal scope of moral judgments and the fact of cultural pluralism or relativism. Can a moral common ground be found that bridges cultural differences?

* HON-100-S02 Enduring Ideas: Natl Sciences 4 9:55AM-11:35AM TTH CLLC TBA S. Thomas
This course is open only to students formally accepted into the Honors Program starting Fall, 2003. This course examines the different ways of learning and knowing and the modes of inquiry practiced by scholars and thinkers in diverse fields of study. It concentrates on the development of thought over time in the natural sciences but also explores social studies, mathematics, language arts, and fine arts. Course experiences are based in interdisciplinary investigations that include modeling, practice, and analysis of ways of inquiring in the several subject areas. Reading of original literature as well as contemporary essays, guest speakers, videos and field trips are part of the course materials. Students will have the option of applying Spanish, French, German or Italian language skills for writing assignments. They will either receive extra credit or a reduced number of assignments.

HON-199-S01 Problem Solving 4 10:40AM-11:45AM MWF KAMM 215 E. Meyer
Students must be of at least sophomore status and a GPA of at least 3.5 or at least sophomore status and be enrolled in the Honors Program. The student will develop his/her problem solving skills using numerous games and puzzles as well as selected problems from the fields of mathematics, physics, and probability. No previous training in these subject areas is necessary. The purpose of the coursee is to develop the studentís mental strength and mental stamina and thus prepare the student for success in the 21st century.

HON-200-S01 Future Human History 4 1:00PM-2:40PM TTH MACS 146 H. Lewellen/G. Rolleston
Open to second year Honors Program students who have taken HON-100. The purpose is to challenge studentsí thinking about what constitutes change, especially with respect to the development of societies and the advancement of scientific thought. We intend to ask such questions as: What constitutes progress? How has science helped us to understand the world more clearly? How does one society achieve precedence over another? Students will be asked to identify the philosophical underpinnings that are best associated to the viewpoints being expressed.

! CHM-200H-S01 Science, Health & the Media 4 9:20AM-10:25AM MWF WILK 100 K. Matera
Students must be of at least sophomore status and be enrolled in the Honors Program, or have at least sophomore status and a GPA of at least 3.5. The study of how the media influences public perceptions of science and health issues.

!* ECN-101H-S01 Principles of Econ I - Honors 4 1:20PM-2:25PM MWF KAMM 215 L. Sage
Core Academic Skill: Problem Solving
Core Academic Skill: Quantitative
Students must be of at least sophomore status and be enrolled in the Honors Program, or have at least sophomore status and a GPA of at least 3.5. Principles and problems of microeconomics: value, distribution and economic decision making. Fundamental assumptions of the discipline and how they have evolved over time are examined.

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