MBA - Entrepreneurship

Find Your Inner Leader
 

Master of Business Administration in Entrepreneurship Courses

Foundation Course Descriptions
The following courses provide a foundation for the MBA program for individuals with limited business training. The Division suggests that students discuss their academic background with the Program Director prior to making a decision to enroll in any of these classes. These courses are three semester credit hours but do not count toward the MBA degree requirement. Individuals who do not have sufficient background in financial accounting or quantitative methods may be required to take one or both of these courses.

BUS

500A

FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

Three credit hours

This course develops a working knowledge of the basic accounting system. The primary focus is on financial accounting by the business entity. Students learn to read and understand the four standard financial reports: the balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows, and statement of retained earnings with emphasis on their implications for management.

BUS

500Q

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

Three credit hours

A course for individuals who have limited skills in Excel, algebraic techniques or statistical analysis. Students are exposed to statistical models and applications for quantitative methods in modern management.

Master in Business Administration in Entrepreneurship
Course Descriptions

A logical progressive sequence is followed in the course offerings. Because of the general systems approach, it is necessary for the student to follow the sequence as outlined. Students may not go out of sequence or take more than two evening courses in any semester without the approval of the director of the MBA program. Required courses are three credit hours each, and the sequence of presentation is as follows:

BUS

501

SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT & ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY

Three credit hours

This course focuses on general systems concepts and the systems management approach to organizations. Students acquire a greater understanding of the interdependence of and interrelationships between elements of a system and its environment. Selected organizational and managerial issues or problems are diagnosed from a system and organizational theory perspective, and solutions are developed that reflect a systemic outlook. Opportunities are provided for applying systems thinking to the students own career or work situation.

BUS

509

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: BUS 501

This course provides an analysis of behavioral science approaches to organizations stressing the implications of theoretical concepts on managerial practice. Topics include functions and dysfunctions of bureaucracy, individual needs and organization requirements, group processes, and organizations as systems. Basic concepts used to study special topics are conflict management, leadership, communications, and organizational change and development.

BUS

524

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE/COMPUTER MODELS

Three credit hours

This course expands the general managers knowledge of the computer models necessary to deal with the complex relationships making up an integrated system. Linear regression, forecasting/time series, linear programming, simulation, and probabilistic decision models are studied. The emphasis is on the description of common management problems in terms of these models, the solution of such models, and the analysis of the results for making decisions from a systems perspective.

BUS

545

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

Three credit hours

Working capital management, cash flow analysis, investment decisions, cost of capital, traditional and non-traditional sources of capital and long-term financial decisions are the focus of this course. The method of presentation takes account of theory, application and integration into the general systems approach.

BUS

548

ACCOUNTING MANAGEMENT

Three credit hours

This course is a study of accounting information for managerial decision-making. Emphasis is on cost behaviors and cost accounting systems applied to management models.  Concepts include job-order costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, activity based costing, profit planning, and variance analysis.

BUS

551E

ENTREPRENEURIAL MARKETING

Three credit hours

This course focuses on methods of achieving marketing objectives in spite of limited resources. A variety of strategic and tactical subjects with which entrepreneurs must deal to maintain effective marketing operations are developed in this class. Examples include the marketing concept, developing a competitive distinction, understanding buyer behavior, channel management, pricing policy and building a supporting information system.

BUS

581

MACROECONOMICS FOR MANAGEMENT

Three credit hours

This course helps participants develop skill in understanding the operation of the United States economy, anticipating the impacts to government policies and other influences on the economy, and understanding the influence of the economy on the individual firm.

BUS

600

POWER, ETHICS, AND SOCIETY

Three credit hours

This course examines the social, ethical, sustainability, and leadership responsibilities of systems managers in relation to the stakeholders affected by managerial decisions-especially customers, the work force, shareholders, and society (including government). Students examine the acquisition and use of power inside and outside the organization through contemporary cases.

BUS

624E

MANAGING BUSINESS OPERATIONS

Three credit hours

This course deals with systems and models that enable the entrepreneur to maximize their business operating environment. Operations analysis tools and methodology are presented in detail to assist in designing, planning, and controlling operations. The course includes analysis and application of inventory models, Microsoft project management, forecasting, feasibility studies and cost benefit analysis.

BUS

625E

CREATING A BUSINESS PLAN

Three credit hours

The course will analyze how a business plan can be an indispensable management tool that provides the foundation for growth that is achieved by starting a new venture, expansion of a product line or acquiring an existing business. A comprehensive business plan will be developed and presented to a panel of business executives and entrepreneurs.

BUS

632E

DEPLOYING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE

Three credit hours

This course establishes a basic capacity for developing management information systems that provide reliable and valid information for managers of diverse functions. Content focuses on using information technology to improve customer service, improve rational thinking and decision-making, establishing pricing methodologies and creating internet distribution channels.

BUS

670E

MANAGING A GROWING BUSINESS

Three credit hours

The course provides students with the opportunity to solve complex problems by integrating the theoretical and practical knowledge acquired in previous courses. Issues related to managing a growing company will be analyzed. Topics include those related to changing organizational structures, measuring economic performance, developing management control systems and the changing role of the entrepreneur.


Experiential Learning Seminars

 

 

ENTREPRENEURIAL IMMERSION

One credit hour

This seminar immerses the individual in the entrepreneurial experience by exposing students to practicing entrepreneurs. They will gain a firsthand awareness of the skills, knowledge and behaviors of successful entrepreneurs. Students will conduct an in-depth personal interview with an entrepreneur. Students will learn to see problems as opportunities and understand the various types of innovation. The range of options for capturing opportunities in spite of significant resource constraints and obstacles will be explored. This topical will be taught by an entrepreneur and a BW faculty member.

 

 

ENTREPRENEURIAL FIELD STUDY

One credit hour

Students will invest a minimum of nine hours working in an entrepreneurial firm experiencing the various roles, decision-making responsibilities and competencies the entrepreneur is required to perform in leading a small, dynamic organization. The student and a faculty advisor will agree on the specific learning objectives, action plans and methods of evaluating the experience.

 

 

NEW VENTURE FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS

One credit hour

 

 

Prerequisite: BUS 551E & BUS 625E

 

The objective of the course is to teach students how to vet the "fuzzy front end" of a new profit or nonprofit venture idea.  To this end, students apply Voice of the Customer and the Real/Win/Worth (RWW) research methodology, along with relevant materials from other courses to learn the initial steps of real world new venture creation by doing it.

 

 

ELECTIVE TOPICAL SEMINAR

One credit hour

Students will select one elective topical seminar. Elective seminars will be offered during a three-week term in the Fall and Spring semesters. These seminars will cover topics of current interest or provide in-depth coverage of selected topics from the core courses.

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