Biology and Geology

 

Biology Course Descriptions

BIO

050

INDEPENDENT STUDY

One to four credit hours

See Independent Study Program, Section II.

BIO

070

INTERNSHIP

One to twelve credit hours

Up to twelve hours may count toward graduation, but only four hours may count toward the biology major.

See Internship Program, Section II.

BIO

259,359,459

FACULTY-STUDENT COLLABORATION

Credit hours to be arranged

See FSC Program, Section II.

BIO

101

HUMAN BIOLOGY

Three credit hours

For non-biology majors only; does not count toward biology major or minor

A non-laboratory scientific study of fundamental biological principles as they pertain to the human condition.

BIO

110L

BIOLOGY FOR THE CITIZEN

Four credit hours

For non-biology majors only; does not count toward biology major or minor

A lecture-laboratory inquiry into selected biological topics of interest to the intelligent citizen.

BIO

111L

FIELD BIOLOGY

Four credit hours

For non-biology majors only; does not count toward biology major or minor

An ecological approach to the study of life with emphasis on the outdoor world and peoples place in it. A field and laboratory course emphasizing the natural history of selected aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems.

BIO

121L

PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY I

Four credit hours

A lecture-laboratory survey of cellular and molecular biological principles. Topics include the chemistry of living cells; cellular structure, function, and metabolism; and the principles of inheritance.

BIO

122L

PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY II

Four credit hours

A lecture-laboratory survey of macro-level biological principles. Topics include evolution, diversity, classification, ecology, and environmental science.

BIO

150I

HUMANS & THE EARTH: CAN WE COEXIST?

Three credit hours

This team taught, interdisciplinary course examines global environmental issues, including biodiversity, climate, energy and population from biological and other disciplinary perspectives. These other perspectives will vary depending upon the academic disciplines of the other two faculty members who will teach the course. The student can satisfy three core credits, either in the sciences (BIO 150I) or in the social sciences (ECN 150I).

BIO

163

FRESHMAN BIOLOGY SEMINAR

One-half credit hours

All biology majors must take this course during their first year of study at Baldwin Wallace.

This course serves as an introduction to the opportunities, expectations, and responsibilities that result from choosing a career in the biological sciences. The course consists of discussions, outside speakers, assessment testing, and presentations given by senior biology majors. Graded S/U.

BIO

180L

INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY

Three credit hours

For non-biology majors only; does not count toward biology major or minor

An introduction to the science of biotechnology. Topics to be covered include a survey of the fundamentals of proteins and DNA, the basic procedures employed in working with these biological molecules, and the construction of recombinant DNA and transgenic animals (“genetic engineering”).  The class will also explore the societal impact of biotechnology.

BIO

200

SCIENCE

Two to four credit hours

A study of a topic in science that involves an interdisciplinary approach. The department under whose auspices the course is offered determines course content.

BIO

203L

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

Four credit hours

A lecture-laboratory course covering cells, tissues and the skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory, and respiratory systems of the human body. Prosected human cadavers, organs and skeletons will be studied in the laboratory portion of the course.

BIO

204

HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 203L

A continuation of BIO 203L, covering the cardiovascular, integumentary, endocrine, immune, digestive, urinary, reproductive and lymphatic systems of the human body. Prosected human cadavers, organs and live human specimens will be studied in the laboratory portion of the course.

BIO

210IEL

TROPICAL ECOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

This course explores ecological principles as demonstrated by interactions among tropical organisms and their environments. The laboratory component of the course involves field work done in a tropical setting.

BIO

211

GENETICS

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L,122L

A lecture-laboratory study of classical, cellular and population genetics.

BIO

212

MICROBIOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L, 122L

A lecture-laboratory study of microorganisms, particularly bacteria. The relationship of these microorganisms to humans is emphasized.

BIO

221

GENERAL ZOOLOGY

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L, 122L

A lecture-laboratory survey of the most common taxa of the animal kingdom.

BIO

222

GENERAL BOTANY

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L, 122L

A lecture-laboratory study of the plant kingdom with emphasis on the flowering plants.

BIO

250

PRINCIPLES OF NEUROSCIENCE

Three credit hours

This course may be taken to partially satisfy the general curriculum requirement in either the Social Sciences or the Natural Sciences.

An introduction to the study of the brain and behavior. In this course students will become familiar with recent advances in the growing field of Neuroscience as they consider how their brains work and how the nervous system grows, perceives, controls the body, sleeps, ages and responds to damage and disease.

BIO

263

SOPHOMORE BIOLOGY SEMINAR

One credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L, 122L Biology majors must take this course during their sophomore year. Transfer biology majors must take this course the next semester after they take BIO 121L/122L if they are sophomores or higher when they transfer in. Otherwise, they must take this course their sophomore year.

Students in this course will learn how to use and interpret the scientific literature, and how to research, develop and deliver a talk on a current topic in Biology.

BIO/PSY

303

PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: PSY 100 or BIO 121L or BIO 203L or consent of instructor. This course may be taken to partially satisfy the general curriculum requirement in the social sciences.

This lecture-laboratory course provides an overview of the physiological bases of behavior, cognition, motivation, emotion, learning and memory. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of brain and endocrine system functioning.

BIO

308

EVOLUTION OF ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 221

Animal Behavior is a broad field, encompassing topics as diverse as the neural basis of perception in insects, to issues such as whether patterns of deviant human behavior like murder and rape conform to evolutionary explanations. This course is a survey of the function, development and evolution of behavior. We will start with an analysis of the mechanics of behavior, including genetic influences, development, and physiological aspects. We will then discuss the ecological significance of behavioral patterns and the adaptations of behavior. Discussion sections will develop your critical reading and thinking skills. Each week we will discuss seminal and/or current papers on the topic covered in class that week. Laboratory exercises are designed to give a hands-on experience designing experiments, observing patterns, making hypotheses, data analysis and interpretation.

BIO

309

VERTEBRATE NATURAL HISTORY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L, 122L

A lecture-laboratory-field study of the evolution and ecology of vertebrate animals.

BIO

310

EVOLUTION

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L, 122L

A lecture-laboratory-field study of the fundamental principles of organic evolution.

BIO

311

CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 211

This class examines the major biological approaches and ecological principles upon which conservation are based and applied. Course topics include the history of the conservation movement, biodiversity, extinctions, population modeling, habitat fragmentation, invasive species, endangered species, conservation genetics, economics, government policy and regulation, restoration ecology and social science elements of conservation strategies designed to conserve diversity. There is a mandatory overnight field trip.

BIO

313

ECOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L, 122L

A laboratory-field study of the concepts of ecology. Representative aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems will be studied.

BIO

314

MOLECULAR ECOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 211. BIO 212 is also recommended.

Molecular ecology is a young and exciting field that is taking advantage of the rapid development of new techniques in molecular genetics as well as advances in the theoretical and statistical approaches to interpreting the wealth of molecular data now available. Essentially, molecular ecology describes the dynamics of evolutionary change at the molecular level. Specifically, molecular ecology employs variation in nucleic acid and/or proteins to answer questions involving organismal behavior, kinship, populations and communities of organisms and phylogenies. The laboratory will be a handson introduction to the standard genetic markers computational techniques culminating in an independent project. After an introduction to some of the techniques and methods, you will be conducting your own independent project in the field. You will be responsible for choosing a study system, collection of tissue samples, extraction of genetic material, and assays of genetic material by one or more molecular markers.

BIO

330

GROSS ANATOMY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L, 122L

This is a lecture-laboratory course in the gross structures of the human body, in which a detailed, regional approach is used.  Student dissection of human cadavers, as well as the study of skeletons and organs will be performed in the laboratory.    

BIO

331

DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 211 or consent of instructor.

A lecture-laboratory course emphasizing the processes and concepts of embryonic development at the cellular, tissue, and organismal levels. A large part of this course is concerned with the biochemical, cellular, and molecular aspects of developmental biology.

BIO

332

HISTOLOGY

Three credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L & 122L or BIO 203L & 204L

A lecture-laboratory study of the microscopic structure of the human body. All organ systems will be covered. Detailed consideration is given to the manner in which cells are organized into tissues and tissues are organized into organs. Slides of mammalian tissues and organs will be studied in the laboratory portion of the course.

BIO

333

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L, 122L

A lecture-laboratory study of the fundamental processes responsible for the normal function of the cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Initial emphasis is given to physiological processes common to all cells of the body. Essential concepts of physiology at the organ and system level are then presented.

BIO

334

INVERTEBRATE NATURAL HISTORY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 221

A laboratory-field study of the ecology, behavior and importance of invertebrate animals. Special emphasis is given to insects and marine organisms.

BIO

336

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 211 is required and BIO 212 is recommended

A lecture-laboratory study of some of the major techniques and applications in molecular biology.

BIO

337

PLANT PHYSIOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 222

A lecture-laboratory study of the mechanisms employed by plants to solve the problems of life on land. Discussion of classic and current papers from the literature is included. Major topics covered are stress physiology, growth and development, and photosynthesis. The cellular and molecular basis for plant function is explored. The implications of plants’ physiological adaptations in ecology and agriculture are emphasized.

BIO

341

IMMUNOLOGY

Four credit hours

Prerequisite: BIO 121L, 122L are required. BIO 211 and BIO 212 are recommended.

A lecture-laboratory study of innate and acquired immune responses.

BIO

363

BIOLOGY SEMINAR

Zero credit hours

This course consists of attending the senior biology seminar (BIO 463) and evaluating the presentations. Graded S/U.

BIO

365

ECOLOGY FIELD STUDIES

Two credit hours

Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor

A field and classroom study of a particular ecosystem. A major component of the course will be an extensive field trip that will take place during or after the semester in which the course is offered. Graded S/U.

BIO

405

ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOLOGY

One to four credit hours

Prerequisite: BUS 121L, 122L, Junior or Senior standing or consent of instructor.  Prerequisite courses will be specified on the basis of the subject offered.

A single topic will be addressed each time the course is offered, but topics chosen may differ.

BIO

463

SENIOR BIOLOGY SEMINAR

One credit hours

Prerequisite: One or two semesters of BIO 363. Must be repeated if grade is below C.

Students enrolled in this course will give an oral presentation to the faculty and students of the Department on a previously approved biological topic that they have researched. They will write a research paper on the same topic.

BIO

491/492

DEPARTMENTAL THESIS/PROJECT

Credit hours to be arranged

See Departmental Thesis/Project, Section II.

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